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Mismanagement of water behind Syria conflict

The conflict in Syria is the culmination of decades of mismanagement of water and land resources, according to an academic from Radboud University in the Netherlands.

Children in war-torn Aleppo, SyriaChildren in war-torn Aleppo, Syria

Writing about the 2006-10 drought in the region, in Middle Eastern Studies journal, Francesca de Châtel made it clear that “it was not the drought per se, but rather the government’s failure to respond to the ensuing humanitarian crisis that formed one of the triggers of the uprising, feeding a discontent that had long been simmering in rural areas".

In her view, the situation now facing Syria is “the culmination of 50 years of sustained mismanagement of water and land resources”. She said the “relentless drive to increase agricultural output and expand irrigated agriculture” blinded policymakers to the limits of the country’s resources; overgrazing caused rapid desertification; the cancellation of subsidies for diesel and fertiliser as part of a botched transition to a social-market economy increased rural poverty; and countless families abandoned their farms for the cities in search of work.

In short, the “ongoing failure to rationalize water use and enforce environmental and water use laws” has depleted resources and caused “growing disenfranchisement and discontent in Syria’s rural communities", she said.

De Châtel is particularly critical of the culture of secrecy that surrounds the subject of water within the Syrian government. She claims that a “fixation on water as a ‘sensitive’ issue has extended far beyond strategic considerations and covers all levels of water management. Water has become a taboo that is reluctantly discussed, not only in the public domain but also at government level".

Author: Natasha Wiseman, Water & Wastewater Treatment Find on Google+
Topic: Water resources
Tags: drought , Syria , economy , government , water , water management , agriculture

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